• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Food And Nutrition Coursework Examples Of Similes

A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things. The simile is usually in a phrase that begins with "as" or "like." (This is different from a metaphor, which is a comparison that says something is something else.) The often nonsensical aspect of similes make them a fun way to get kids excited about reading and writing. 

See more similes with our simile flashcard set. 

Simile Examples

Kids can have fun using these simile examples that begin with “as”:

  • As American as apple pie
  • As big as an elephant
  • As black as coal
  • As blind as a bat
  • As bold as brass
  • As boring as watching paint dry  
  • As brave as a lion
  • As bright as a button
  • As busy as a bee
  • As cheap as dirt 
  • As clean as a whistle
  • As clear as mud
  • As clear as crystal
  • As cold as ice
  • As cool as a cucumber
  • As crooked as a dog's hind leg
  • As cunning as a fox
  • As cute as a bug's ear
  • As dead as a doornail
  • As deaf as a post
  • As difficult as nailing jelly to a tree
  • As dry as a bone
  • As dull as dishwater
  • As easy as ABC
  • As fit as a fiddle
  • As flat as a pancake
  • As free as a bird
  • As fresh as a daisy
  • As gentle as a lamb
  • As good as gold
  • As happy as a dog with two tails
  • As hard as nails
  • As heavy as lead
  • As helpless as a baby
  • As honest as the day is long  
  • As hot as blue blazes
  • As hungry as a bear
  • As innocent as a lamb
  • As large as life
  • As light as a feather
  • As long as a month of Sundays
  • As loose as a goose
  • As mad as a hatter
  • As mad as a hornet
  • As nervous as a long tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs
  • As nutty as a fruitcake
  • As old as the hills
  • As pale as death
  • As plain as the nose on your face  
  • As playful as a kitten  
  • As pleased as Punch  
  • As proud as a peacock
  • As quick as lightning
  • As quiet as a church mouse
  • As regular as clockwork  
  • As scarce as hen's teeth
  • As sharp as a razor
  • As sick as a dog
  • As silent as the grave
  • As slippery as an eel
  • As slow as molasses in January  
  • As sly as a fox
  • As smooth as a baby's bottom
  • As snug as a bug in a rug
  • As solid as the ground we stand on
  • As sour as vinegar
  • As steady as a rock
  • As stiff as a board
  • As straight as an arrow
  • As strong as an ox
  • As stubborn as a mule
  • As sturdy as an oak
  • As sweet as pie
  • As tall as a giraffe
  • As thin as a rake
  • As tight as a drum
  • As timid as a rabbit
  • As tough as old boots
  • As useless as a chocolate teapot  
  • As warm as toast
  • As welcome as a skunk at a lawn party
  • As white as snow
  • As wise as an owl

Or try using some of these similes that start with "like": 

  • (Sing) like an angel
  • (Act) like an animal
  • (Eat) like a bird
  • (Fight) like cats and dogs
  • (Work) like a dog
  • Like a dream
  • (Soar) like an eagle
  • Like fingernails on a chalkboard
  • Like a fish
  • (Racing) like a frightened rabbit
  • (Have eyes) like a hawk
  • (Eat) like a horse
  • (Sleep) like a log
  • Like a moth to the flame
  • (Eat) like a pig
  • Like a pile of rocks
  • Like a rose
  • Like a screaming baby
  • Like stars
  • (Meandered) like a stream
  • Like two peas in a pod
  • (Exploded) like a volcano

You can find more Examples of Similes, as well as information about other Figurative Language, here on YourDictionary. And you can use the helpful infographic on this page to remind you of the differences between similes and metaphors.

Do you have a good example to share? Add your example here.

comments powered by

Simile Examples for Kids

By YourDictionary

A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things. The simile is usually in a phrase that begins with "as" or "like." (This is different from a metaphor, which is a comparison that says something is something else.) The often nonsensical aspect of similes make them a fun way to get kids excited about reading and writing. See more similes with our simile flashcard set. 

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind. A simile is one of the most common forms of figurative language. Similes can be found just about anywhere from poems to song lyrics and even in everyday conversations.

Similes and metaphors are often confused with one another. The main difference between a simile and metaphor is that a simile uses the words "like" or "as" to draw a comparison and a metaphor simply states the comparison without using "like" or "as". An example of a simile is: She is as innocent as an angel. An example of a metaphor is: She is an angel.

Similes in Everyday Language

Similes are used in literature to make writing more vivid and powerful. In everyday speech they can be used to convey meaning quickly and effectively, as many commonly used expressions are similes. For example, when someone says “He is as busy as a bee,” it means he is working hard, as bees are known to be extremely busy. If someone says "I am as snug as a bug in a rug," they mean that they feel very comfortable and cozy or are tucked up tight in bed.

Some other well-known similes you will often hear are:

  • As cute as a kitten
  • As happy as a clam
  • As light as a feather
  • As blind as a bat
  • As bold as brass
  • As bright as a button
  • As shiny as a new pin
  • As cold as ice
  • As common as dirt
  • As cool as a cucumber
  • As hard as nails
  • As hot as hell
  • As innocent as a lamb
  • As tall as a giraffe
  • As tough as nails
  • As white as a ghost
  • As sweet as sugar
  • As black as coal

As with a lot of figurative language, when talking to someone from another region or who's not speaking in their native language they might not get the meaning of many similes.

Similes Add Depth to Language

Similes can make our language more descriptive and enjoyable. Writers, poets, and songwriters make use of similes often to add depth and emphasize what they are trying to convey to the reader or listener. Similes can be funny, serious, mean, or creative.

Following are some more examples of similes regularly used in writing:

  • You were as brave as a lion.
  • They fought like cats and dogs.
  • He is as funny as a barrel of monkeys.
  • This house is as clean as a whistle.
  • He is as strong as an ox.
  • Your explanation is as clear as mud.
  • Watching the show was like watching grass grow.
  • That is as easy as shooting fish in a barrel.
  • This contract is as solid as the ground we stand on.
  • That guy is as nutty as a fruitcake.
  • Don’t just sit there like a bump on a log.
  • Well, that went over like a lead balloon.
  • They are as different as night and day.
  • She is as thin as a rake.
  • Last night, I slept like a log.
  • This dress is perfect because it fits like a glove.
  • They wore jeans, which made me stand out like a sore thumb.
  • My love for you is as deep as the ocean.
  • I am so thirsty that my throat is as dry as a bone.

Examples of similes can be seen in classic literature, such as in the poem "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns:

O my Luve is like a red, red rose
That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve is like the melody
That’s sweetly played in tune.

Another example of a simile can be found in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. When Romeo talks to Mercutio before the Capulets' party, he makes the following comparison about love:

"Is love a tender thing? It is too rough, too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn."

Similes can often be found in song lyrics, as they let you convey deeper meaning with fewer words. For example:

  • "My heart is like an open highway." - "It's My Life," Bon Jovi
  • "It’s been a hard days night, and I've been working like a dog." - "A Hard Day's Night," The Beatles
  • "And it seems to me you lived your life, Like a candle in the wind." - "Candle in the Wind," Elton John
  • "You're as cold as ice." - "Cold As Ice," Foreigner
  • "Steady as a preacher, Free as a weed" - "American Honey," Lady Antebellum

You can even find similes in popular ads and company slogans such as:

  • Chevrolet: "Built Like A Rock"
  • Doritos: "Tastes Like Awesome Feels"
  • State Farm: "Like A Good Neighbor"
  • Almond Joy / Mounds: "Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't."
  • Honda: "The Honda's ride is as smooth as a gazelle in the Sahara. It's comfort is like a hug from Nana."

Get Creative with Similes

Similes are a great tool to use in creative language and are fun to come up with. They not only make what you are writing or saying more interesting, but they can often intrigue the reader as well. When creating your own similes, watch out for cliches though and try to go beyond the obvious comparisons.

For more examples, check out our Simile Flashcards or fun list of similes at  Simile Examples for Kids.

Do you have a good example to share? Add your example here.

comments powered by

Examples of Similes

By YourDictionary

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind. A simile is one of the most common forms of figurative language. Similes can be found just about anywhere from poems to song lyrics and even in everyday conversations. Similes and metaphors are often confused with one another. The main difference between a simile and metaphor is that a simile uses the words "like" or "as" to draw a comparison and a metaphor simply states the comparison without using "like" or "as". An example of a simile is: She is as innocent as an angel. An example of a metaphor is: She is an angel.

One thought on “Food And Nutrition Coursework Examples Of Similes

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *